Edward Killingsworth, Architect

Piedmont, California

The Spaulding House, 1965
A legendary mid-century modern home awaits, nestled in lush foothills, canopied with oaks. The Spaulding House, designed by famed architect Edward Killingsworth, is among the East Bay’s most exclusive mid-century properties. From its completion in 1965 to today, the home remains a masterpiece of classic contemporary design.
Killingsworth’s Spaulding home is a flawless expression of the ideals of the famed Case Study Program, the experimental post-war project to redefine domestic architecture that included not only Killingsworth, but also Charles and Ray Eames, Richard Neutra, Raphael Soriano, and many other names synonymous with 20 century American design.
Built at the same time as his Case Study projects, the Spaulding House is the only home that Killingsworth built outside of Southern California. The house features the exquisite details that define his singular contribution the Case Study program, including long, attenuated structural elements, 10 feet ceilings, walls of glass, an exterior arcade, and extensive architect-designed cabinetry and built-ins, all within a floor plan that is uniquely livable. The attention to both form and function, from the engineering of the home’s infrastructure to the precise lines of its cabinets, is exceptional. As the famed photographer of architecture Julius Shulman said of Killingsworth, “His homes are the best and most elegant of anyone’s”. The Spaulding House is that and more, an architectural wonder, a flowing, inviting space that envelopes you in the park-like landscape and panoramic vista just beyond its windows.
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